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Get Help – For Survivors/Victims

get help iconWe know it took courage to come to this website for answers. We want to help you. Click the link below that describes your situation best:

I have been sexual assaulted

No matter what the circumstances surrounding your assault, it is not your fault. Sexual activity without clear consent of all parties involved is not okay.

Click here to learn how to receive help at UMBC and/or report your incident.

Sexual Assault Forensic Exam (SAFE)

If the assault occurred within the last 120 hours (approximately 5 days), VAV encourages you to receive a SAFE. This exam collects forensic evidence in the event you choose to pursue charges. In addition to the collection of evidence, you will receive a medical assessment and be provided with preventative antibiotic treatment and emergency contraception. Also:

  • The exam is free – it will not be billed to your insurance.
  • The exam is confidential for people ages 13 and older who have been assaulted by a non-caregiver.
  • The exam is performed by a nurse who is specially trained in performing the SAFE and to handling your situation in a sensitive, non-judgmental manner.

Recommendations:

  • If possible, avoid showering, using the bathroom, and changing or washing clothes prior to the exam.
  • Keep any evidence, such as undergarments, other clothing, or sheets, in a paper (vs. plastic) bag since it preserve the evidence better.
  • Bring all evidence to the SAFE; it will be collected.
  • It is recommended, though not required that you receive the SAFE in the same county you were assaulted. For on-campus assaults, GBMC is the recommended hospital.
  • If needed, free transportation can be arranged through UMBC Police (no charges need to be filed).

The following local hospitals perform the SAFE:

Greater Baltimore Medical Center
6701 North Charles Street, Baltimore (Towson), MD 21204
443-849-3323

Mercy Hospital
301 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore (City), MD 21202
410-332-9499

Howard County General Hospital
5755 Cedar Lane, Columbia, MD 21044
410-740-7778

The following UMBC departments can arrange for transportation to a SAFE 24 hours a day:

University Health Services 410-455-3751
Campus Police (after-hours) 410-455-5555

I am in an abusive relationship (physically or non-physical)

No matter what your abuser may be telling you, the abuse is not your fault.

Sometimes the abuse is physical, sometimes it is not. Some signs you may need help include:

  • Your partner decides what you do, who your friends are, what you wear, or where you go more times than not.
  • Your partner uses physical force, threats, and/or coercion to get you to participate in a sexual act.
  • Your partner puts you down, even if he/she says itʼs ʻjust a jokeʼ and claims ʻyou are so sensitive.ʼ
  • Your partner repeatedly sends you unwanted texts, social media messages, or calls you despite you telling him/her to stop, or even if you haven’t told him/her to stop out of fear of his/her reaction.
  • Your partner hits you, grabs you in anger, shoves you, twists your arm, threatens to hurt you or someone/thing you love.
  • Youʼre afraid to say ʻnoʼ to your partner, whether itʼs about sex or about going out when you really need to study.
  • Your partner shows up where you are more often than you think is normal or tracks your every move via social media or GPS.
  • In an effort to control you, your partner someone threatens to expose your intimate secrets or photos.

If any of the above is true, even if you partner has never physically hurt you, we are here to help.

Click here to learn how to receive help at UMBC and/or report your situation.

I am being stalked

You may initially see your stalker’s behavior as innocent or just odd but it can turn into a scary situation. Let us help you before things escalate.

Stalking can included when someone physically follows you, shows up where you are more often than you think is normal, tracks your every move via social media or GPS, and more. These actions can be by a stranger, acquaintance, or someone you have been dating for months or years.

Click here to learn how to receive help at UMBC and/or report your situation.

I am being harassed (in-person or online)

Harassment of a sexual nature can happen in many forms. Harassment can include, but is not limited to:

  •         Someone making comments that make you feel uncomfortable (of a sexual nature, about your gender or sexual orientation, etc).
  •         Someone putting his/her hand on your shoulder, thigh, arm etc. and have not stopped despite you asking (or you fear asking).
  •         Someone exposing or threatening to expose intimate details or photos of you online or otherwise.
  • Someone repeatedly sending unwanted texts, social media messages, or calling despite you telling him/her to stop (or you fear telling him/her to stop).

Click here to learn how to receive help at UMBC and/or report your situation.

I am not sure how to describe my situation

Some signs you may need help….
  1. Your partner decides what you do, who your friends are, what you wear, or where you go more times than not.
  2. An intimate partner or a person you just met used physical force, threats, and/or coercion to get you to participate in a sexual act.
  3. Your partner puts you down, even if he/she says itʼs ʻjust a jokeʼ and claims ʻyou are so sensitive.ʼ
  4. If someone repeatedly sends you unwanted texts, social media messages, or calls you despite you telling him/her to stop, or even if you haven’t told him/her to stop out of fear of his/her reaction.
  5. Your partner hits you, grabs you in anger, shoves you, twists your arm, threatens to hurt you or someone/thing you love.
  6. Youʼre afraid to say ʻnoʼ to your partner, whether itʼs about sex or about going out when you really need to study.
  7. Someone inappropriately touches you or makes comments of a sexual nature that makes you feel uncomfortable. Even someone repeatedly putting his/her hand on your back when you have made it clear you do not want him/her doing that is considered harassment.
  8. An intimate partner, friend, or stranger, shows up where you are more often than you think is normal or tracks your every move via social media or GPS.
  9. In an effort to control you, someone threatens to expose your intimate secrets or photos.

Report an Incident, or I’m unsure about reporting

To learn more about your reporting options, including confidential reporting visit the link above.

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